Palo Alto vs East Palo Alto

ACROSS A BRIDGE ….

An image is worth a 1000 words: Use the Google Street View to ROTATE 180 degrees – one bridge and two worlds. On one side 300.000 to 1 million dollar homes on the other 1 to 6 million dollar homes:


 Example – 890 Bell St. East Palo Alto, California:

See map in LARGE format for the 9 minute drive from Bell St, East Palo Alto to Melville Ave, Palo Alto:

Today in East Palo Alto a huge number of poor and lower middle class people are trying to make ends meet about 9 minutes by car from the downtown section of one of the most expensive cities in the United States. – See: In heart of Silicon Valley, all but highest earners being priced out.

Essential to note: it is only by COMPARISON WITH PALO ALTO that EAST PALO ALTO gets a bad name. Ended are the days of drug gang killings which plagued the 1990s and gave – in 1992 – East Palo Alto the highest murder rate in the US. – See crimereports.com for past 6 months and “East Palo Alto rebounds as crime plummets, economy thrives.”

Palo Alto vs East Palo Alto:

Income and Poverty for Palo Alto
i Median household income (in 2014 dollars), 2010-2014 $126,771
i Per capita income in past 12 months (in 2014 dollars), 2010-2014 $75,257
Income and Poverty for East Palo Alto
i Median household income (in 2014 dollars), 2010-2014 $52,716
i Per capita income in past 12 months (in 2014 dollars), 2010-2014 $18,527

Palo Alto vs East Palo Alto — Statistics, Demographics, Crime Statistics. IMAGE VIA: mixedmetro.us
Image from mixedmetro.us

Education statistics for Palo Alto 
iHigh school graduate or higher, percent of persons age 25 years+, 2010-2014 97.5%
iBachelor’s degree or higher, percent of persons age 25 years+, 2010-2014 80.3%
Education statistics for East Palo Alto
i High school graduate or higher, percent of persons age 25 years+, 2010-2014 66.5%
i Bachelor’s degree or higher, percent of persons age 25 years+, 2010-2014 16.0%

 

Race and Hispanic Origin for Palo Alto
i White alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i White alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 64.2%
i Black or African American alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i Black or African American alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 1.9%
i American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 0.2%
i Asian alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i Asian alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 27.1%
i Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 0.2%
i Two or More Races, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) X
i Two or More Races, percent, April 1, 2010 4.2%
i Hispanic or Latino, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (b) X
i Hispanic or Latino, percent, April 1, 2010 (b) 6.2%
i White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) X
i White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, April 1, 2010 60.6%
Race and Hispanic Origin for East Palo Alto
i White alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i White alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 28.8%
i Black or African American alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i Black or African American alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 16.7%
i American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 0.4%
i Asian alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i Asian alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 3.8%
i Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (a) X
i Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, April 1, 2010 (a) 7.5%
i Two or More Races, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) X
i Two or More Races, percent, April 1, 2010 4.8%
i Hispanic or Latino, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) (b) X
i Hispanic or Latino, percent, April 1, 2010 (b) 64.5%
i White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, July 1, 2014, (V2014) X
i White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, April 1, 2010 6.2%

[Source: East Palo Alto vs Palo Alto]

In detail – East Palo Alto Demographics :

Land Area: 2.5 square miles

Population

Year Count
1990 23,570
2000 29,506
2005 33,000
2009 33,575
2010 28,155

Population by Gender

Gender Population Percentage
Female 49%
Male 51%

Population by Age Group

Age Range Population Percentage
Under 5 years 8.1%
5 to 9 years 7.8%
10 to 14 years 8.4%
15 to 19 years 10.4%
20 to 24 years 9.6%
25 to 34 years 16.3%
35 to 44 years 15.1%
45 to 54 years 11.3%
55 to 59 years 4.0%
60 to 64 years 2.1%
65 to 74 years 3.4%
75 to 84 years 2.7%
85 years and over 0.5%

Median Age: 28.8

Racial Composition3

Race Population Percentage
American Indian & Alaska 0.2%
Asian 7.2%
Black / African American 15.6%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 61.1%
Islander 10.9%
White 7.2%
Other 7.1%

Education
Level of Educational Attainment of people 25 years and older.

Degree Population Percentage
Graduate / Professional Degree 7.0%
Bachelor’s Degree 11.3%
Associate Degree 4.0%
Some College (no degree) 17.1%
High School Graduate 26.8%
Grades 9-12 (no diploma) 14.3%
Less than 9th Grade 19.5%

Median Household Income

Year Annual Income
20103 $48,734

Median Sales Price for Single Family Residences

Year Sales Price
2011 $255,000

Notes

  • 1 – Human Resources Department, City of East Palo Alto
  • 2 – State of California, Department of Finance estimates.
  • 3 – United States Census Bureau, 2009-2010 American Community Survey
  • 4 – San Mateo County 2010 Annual Real Estate Report
  • Population Estimates for Cities, Counties, and the
    State January 1, 2012 and 2013

    [Source: http://www.ci.east-palo-alto.ca.us]

2010 Census

2014 American Community Survey

2014 Population Estimates Program

Census 2000

More:

Areaconnect.com”, “Bayareacensus.ca”, “Census.gov”, “Neighborhoodscout.com

Sfrealtors.com”, “City-data.com”,“Bayareacensus.ca.gov”, “Point2homes.com

Areavibes.com”, “Law.berkeley.edu”, “Roadsidethoughts.com”.


East Palo Alto city – History:

For most of its history, East Palo Alto was part of unincorporated San Mateo County. As such, it did not have an official boundary until it incorporated in 1983. However, the area historically regarded as East Palo Alto was much larger than the city’s current 2.5 square miles. Large tracts were annexed by Menlo Park and Palo Alto from the late 1940s to the early 1960s.

African American migrants first arrived in East Palo Alto around the end of World War II.  Most of these Southern migrants moved in to take advantage of low cost housing and because, unlike surrounding peninsula communities, the area had few restrictive housing covenants.  By the 1960s jobs and the possibility for higher education brought a second wave of African American settlers.

By 1960, East Palo Alto was a small, predominately black community surrounded by richer, mostly white San Francisco and San Jose suburbs.  Its work force found employment outside the area.  East Palo Alto remained an unincorporated area governed by San Mateo County. Its residents had a limited voice in policies that impacted them. The widening of Highway 101 in the 1950s, for example, eliminated 45 of the community’s leading businesses. Menlo Park and Palo Alto annexed 25 percent of the community in the 1960s, depriving it of both population and property tax revenue.  Residents were also heavily taxed for county services, such as sanitation, water, and recreation.

To counter this secondary status, the people of East Palo Alto attempted to incorporate five times between 1931 and 1981.  They were successful only in 1983.  In the 1968 attempt, some local black leaders tried to rename the city Nairobi, after Kenya’s capital city. Despite incorporation in 1983, East Palo Alto suffered through continued population loss, which followed increasing flight of its black middle class and crime rates spurred by drug sales and use.

By the year 2000, Mexican Americans, Mexican immigrants, and Pacific Islanders replaced African Americans as the major demographic group in the city.  By that year blacks comprised only 17% of the city’s 28,000 residents.  East Palo Alto’s economic fortunes finally began to rise in this period as well when high land prices elsewhere in the Bay Area persuaded business leaders to establish the Four Seasons Hotel, the first major hotel in the city, the Ravenswood Shopping Center, and the new corporate headquarters of Facebook.
– Via: http://www.blackpast.org/

On the city of East Palo Alto’s website we read:

The People
The original inhabitants were Ohlone / Costanoan Native Americans. Spanish ranchers took over, followed by Caucasian speculators and settlers. For a time Chinese laborers were prevalent. Asian and Italian flower growers preceded the flood of middle-class Caucasians drawn to post-war housing developments. East Palo Alto later became the largest African American community on the peninsula. Today the city possesses a multi-ethnic population which includes a large number of Hispanics and Pacific Islanders.
Trade
Trade has alternately focused on ranching, transportation and shipping, brick manufacturing, farming, servicing travelers of Bayshore Highway and Dumbarton Bridge, and flower growing. At present there is a mix of small industrial, agricultural and commercial businesses.
Growth
These changes, and the population shifts that accompanied them, may be partially responsible for the notion that East Palo Alto lacks the kind of strong community identity possessed by its neighbors. Since it was founded around 1849, the town has experienced erratic growth and frequent conflict.

City Characteristics
But some things have remained constant, namely the characteristics that have always attracted people to the area: the price of land and housing; a beautiful, rural-like setting; its centralized location; proximity to transportation and San Francisco Bay; and some of the most enviable weather in the nation.
[VIA]

In 2011, Prof. Zephyr Frank, Director of the Spatial History Project, invited Michael Levin to continue his work on East Palo Alto at the Project and incorporate a new geospatial focus on a how a convergence of space, race, economics and history shaped the development of the community and how exploring this process might allow for new ways of understanding it.
Rebooting History builds on nearly 20 years of documenting the process of urban change in East Palo Alto.

The effort began with the production of the award-winning 1996 documentary Dreams of a City: Creating East Palo produced by Michael Levin for Stanford University Libraries and the Committee on Black Performing Arts. More: web.stanford.edu

Palo Alto was established by Leland Stanford Sr. when he founded Stanford University, following the death of his son, Leland Stanford Jr. The city includes portions of Stanford and is headquarters to a number of high-technology and social media firms; it is the home of Silicon Valley.  Palo Alto’s earliest recorded history dates from 1769, when Gaspar de Portolá noted an Ohlonesettlement. This remains an area of known Indian mounds. A plaque at Middlefield Road and Embarcadero Road commemorates the area … More: wikipedia.org

Do see as well pahistory.org.

 

Neighborhoods in Palo Alto:

(Palo Alto, California Neighborhood Map)